131 Proactive Bills Introduced

HIGHLIGHTS

So far during the current legislative sessions, abortion rights legislators have introduced at least 131 proactive bills, as well as 16 others that repeal abortion restrictions. Thirty-six bills have passed at least one committee and 5 bills have been adopted or enacted.


Legislation expanding access to abortion

Washington HB 1647 which passed the House, but failed, and Washington SB 5574 which passed the first committee, but failed would have required health insurance policies to cover abortion care. Virginia HB 1225 and SB 183 would have reversed prohibitions on abortion coverage and allowed all health insurance policies to cover abortion care, but died in committee. Illinois HB 4013, which provides for both Medicaid and private coverage for abortion care, passed the House Committee on Human Services.

See the model legislation, Abortion Coverage Equity Act from the Public Leadership Institute’s Playbook for Abortion Rights



Legislation to Guarantee Medically Accurate Abortion Care

Arizona SB 1445 which will prohibit punishing a health professional for educating or advising a patient about lawful healthcare services passed both chambers and was sent to the Governor’s desk. See the model legislation, Patient’s Right to Abortion Information Act from the Public Leadership Institute’s Playbook for Abortion Rights

 

Washington HB 1787 and SB 5770 which would have prohibited health care facilities from limiting providers’ patient care, both failed. See the model legislation, Protect Physician Integrity from Political Interference Act from the Public Leadership Institute’s Playbook for Abortion Rights

Virginia HB 94 and SB 648 which would have allowed women seeking an abortion to decline procedures and restrictions that are not required by evidence-based medicine, both failed. See the model legislation, Abortion With Dignity Act from the Public Leadership Institute’s Playbook for Abortion Rights


Legislation to protect clinic patients and staff New Hampshire SB 542, which passed the first committee, would amend civil and criminal law to prohibit harassment of clinic patients and staff. California AB 2263, which would protect individuals associated with reproductive healthcare by prohibiting entities from publicly posting their home addresses, passed the first committee. See the model legislation, Prevent Anti-Abortion Terrorism Act from the Public Leadership Institute’s Playbook for Abortion Rights


Legislation to prevent employment discrimination and interference New York SB 2709, which passed the first committee, would protect employees from employment discrimination based on reproductive health choices. Delaware HB 316 and HB 317, both of which have passed the first committee, would prohibit discrimination of an employee or potential employee, based on reproductive health decisions.  See the model legislation Keep Bosses Out of the Bedroom Act from the Public Leadership Institute’s Playbook for Abortion Rights


Legislation to expand access to Long-acting Reversible Contraception (LARCs)

New Mexico SM 58, which will create a working group that studies the effect of LARCs access, was adopted. Missouri HB 2775 which would allow the transfer of an unclaimed LARC to another eligible patient was introduced. Florida HB 947, which failed would have expanded access to Long Acting Reversible Contraception (LARCs).

Since the original funding for the Colorado Family Planning Initiative ended, and the legislature failed to pass HB 15-1194 in May 2015, Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper signed the budget bill, HB 1405 which provides $2.5 million for the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment to provide LARCs to low income and uninsured women.

See the model legislation, Long-Acting Birth Control Information Act from the Public Leadership Institute’s Playbook for Abortion Rights


Legislation to allow pharmacists to prescribe contraception

The following bills would have authorized pharmacists to prescribe and dispense contraceptive supplies: Hawaii SB 2320, which passed the Senate and was sent to the House; Missouri HB 1679, which passed the House and was referred to the Senate; Washington SB 6467, which passed the first committee, but failed; Wisconsin AB 968 which failed to pass; and Missouri HB 1679, which passed the first chamber and was referred to the Senate; New Jersey SB 1073 passed the first committee; and Washington SB 6467, which passed the first committee and then failed.

District of Columbia B21-707 which would authorize pharmacists to prescribe and dispense contraceptive supplies and would require insurance coverage of a twelve-month supply of contraception was introduced.

Washington HB 2681, which will require a sticker or sign to be visibly posted in pharmacies in order to increase awareness of the availability of contraceptives, was enacted.


Legislation to ensure coverage for a 12-month supply of contraception

The following bills would require insurance coverage for up to a twelve-month supply of contraception: Colorado HB 1322 passed the House and was referred to the Senate;  Washington HB 1647, which passed the House, but failed; Washington SB 6369 which failed, but was reintroduced and retained in present status; California SB 999, passed the first committee; Washington HB 2465 which passed second committee, but was withdrawn from House Committee on Rules; Alaska SB 156, which passed the first committee.  

Hawaii SB 2319  which will require insurers to cover a twelve-month period of contraception, passed both houses and is eligible for the Governor’s signature.

District of Columbia B21-707 which would authorize pharmacists to prescribe and dispense contraceptive supplies and would require insurance coverage of up to twelve-month supply of contraception was introduced.


Legislation to provide a form of contraceptive equity in insurance coverage

Maryland SB 848 which will provide contraceptive equity in insurance coverage passed both houses and is eligible for the governor’s signature.

Vermont HB 620 which will provide contraceptive equity in insurance coverage passed both houses and is eligible for the governor’s signature.

The following bills would ensure that insurance policies provide coverage for all types of contraceptive medication and devices: Maryland HB 1005 passed the first chamber and the second committee; Illinois HB 5576, passed the House and is in the Senate; Alaska HB 345, passed the first committee; Colorado HB 1294, passed the House; Illinois HB 5576 passed the House; New York AB 8135 passed the Assembly; Washington HB 1502 and WashingtonSB 6493, both failed; and Florida SB 1048 was withdrawn.


Legislation to expose the hypocrisy of the anti-abortion movement Kentucky HB 396, which failed and South Carolina HB 4544, which passed the first committee, both satirically expose the hypocrisy of the anti-abortion movement by legislating Erectile Dysfunction in the way that abortion is legislated: See the model legislation, Medical Equity Now (MEN) Act from the Public Leadership Institute’s Playbook for Abortion Rights


Legislation to demonstrate support for abortion rights

California SJR 19 which requests the President and the Congress of the United States to express their support for access to comprehensive reproductive healthcare, including the services provided by Planned Parenthood, and to oppose efforts to eliminate federal funding for Planned Parenthood was adopted by the Senate and referred to the Assembly.

New Jersey ACR 119, which passed the Assembly Committee on Human Services; and New Jersey SCR 78 which passed the second committee both affirm women’s access to reproductive healthcare and celebrate the anniversary of Roe v. Wade,.

Hawaii SCR 85 and Hawaii SR 56 both of which affirm the State’s support of Planned Parenthood and denounce violence towards abortion providers and their patients were adopted.

See the model legislation, Abortion Is Health Care Resolution from the Public Leadership Institute’s Playbook for Abortion Rights


Legislation to repeal anti-abortion rights laws

New York AB 6221, which passed the assembly, would repeal a telemedicine abortion ban.

Virginia HB 43, which failed and SB 53, which is pending carryover to 2017, would repeal ultrasound requirements.

See the model legislation, Prevent Political Interference from Delaying Abortion Act from the Public Leadership Institute’s Playbook for Abortion Rights


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